B10 Study units: KS3

 

B10 Statutory Programmes of Study

 

KEY STAGE 3

 

Introduction

 

These units take the form of a key question followed by a series of supplementary questions which provide the shape and structure of the individual unit. Taken collectively the units provide an important balance between AT1 and AT2 and ensure full coverage of the six areas of enquiry.

The characteristics of learning listed at the end of this section highlight the essence of RE at Key stage 3 and the opportunities/experiences provide guidance on learning activities. At Key Stage 3 and 4 it is particularly important that curriculum time is found for Buddhism, Sikhism and a non-religious worldview such as Humanism to be studied in depth.

Each unit is followed by the MINIMUM expected learning outcomes. Pupils will usually learn much more than this in their RE, but there is a core of knowledge, understanding and skills that should be achieved if further progress is to be made. Note that Christianity is mentioned in each unit, but that learning about and from Christianity is not a compulsory part of each and every unit.

Examples of how pupils might demonstrate whether they are below, within, secure or exceeding each statement will be given in the AMV Learning Outcomes document

It is recommended that pupils are given feedback on how well they are doing in RE in relation to these statements. The statements can also be used to indicate what pupils need to do next in order to make progress. Items in square brackets within the Learning Outcomes statements need not be covered in that particular unit of study.

It is also recommended that teachers give feedback to pupils on the attitudes shown to their learning in RE. For example, do they grow in confidence about their own beliefs and identity? Do they reflect on what they are learning and use empathy and imagination? Do they look beyond surface impressions and search for meaning in life? Do they listen carefully to the views of others and consider evidence and argument? Do they recognise the needs and concerns of others? Do they appreciate that people’s beliefs are often deeply felt? Do they develop a balanced sense of self-worth and value?


 

  1. What experiences and beliefs are important to me and to others? [A&D]

This unit explores ideas of what it is to be human and relates them to religious and other beliefs

 

(a) What makes human beings special?
(b) What do we mean by the human spirit?
(c) Why is prayer, reflection and contemplation important for some people?
(d) What do we mean by religious experience?
(e) What do I think about the value and purpose of human beings?

Minimum Learning Outcomes (below / within / secure / exceeding/mastery) for KS3:

Religions & Worldviews a: give different views on how faith may play a vital part in people’s identity;

And d: use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teaching and ethical issues;

Christianity c: suggest reasons for different understandings of the resurrection of Jesus that Christians hold and show how they may have an impact on Christians today;

Other religion/worldview a: describe and compare different interpretations of religious identity;

Throughout: use reasoning and examples to express their own views on how Christianity and other the tradition(s) being studied have affected the world.

Exemplar Scheme of Learning for this unit [TBA]

Assessment Exemplar part 1 for this unit

Assesment Exemplar part 2


2. Does our planet have a future? [B&E]

This unit explores the purposes of life on earth which are reflected in the pattern of religious and other practices/lifestyles

 

(a) What attitudes do people have towards the environment?
(b) Do animals matter and how should they be treated?
(c) What do religions and beliefs say about conservation and stewardship?
(d) How do religions and beliefs reflect the preciousness of the world in some of their festivals and celebrations?
(e) Are things getting better or worse for the environment? Why?

Minimum Learning Outcomes (below / within / secure / exceeding/mastery) for KS3:

Religions & Worldviews c: ask questions about the meaning of religion and spirituality and suggest answers relating to the search for truth;

And d: use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teaching and ethical issues;

Christianity c: explain the challenges of the Christian principles of love, forgiveness and trust in God with reference to key texts;

Other religion/worldview b: explain how and why people express beliefs, values and ideas of spirituality through ceremonies, festivals and other creative ways;

Throughout: use reasoning and examples to express their own views on how Christianity and other the tradition(s) being studied have affected the world.

Exemplar Scheme of Learning for this unit

Assessment Exemplar for this unit

  1. Where are the answers to life’s big questions? [C&F]

This unit explores how religions express values and commitments in a variety of creative ways

 

(a) How do people express in creative ways their deepest values and commitments?
(b) What is meant by truth?
(c) Why are, for some people, sacred texts, teachings and places really important?
(d) In what ways might religious teachings and beliefs matter today?

Minimum Learning Outcomes (below / within / secure / exceeding/mastery) for KS3:

Religions & Worldviews c: ask questions about the meaning of religion and spirituality and suggest answers relating to the search for truth;

And d: use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teachings and ethical issues;

Christianity b: explain how and why examples of creativity may express or challenge Christian beliefs about the Fall, redemption and salvation;

Other religion/worldview b: explain how and why people express beliefs, values and ideas of spirituality through ceremonies, festivals and other creative ways;

Throughout: use reasoning and examples to express their own views on how Christianity and other the tradition(s) being studied have affected the world.

Exemplar Scheme of Learning for this unit

Supplementary Resources for this unit

Assessment Exemplar for this unit

  1. What can we learn from religions, beliefs and communities today? [B&D]

This unit explores ideas of those aspects of human nature which relate to religious practices, communities and celebrations

 

(a) What is the impact of religion and beliefs in the:
·      local community
·      wider area in and around Somerset
·      diversity of the UK
·      global community
(b) Why does hatred and persecution sometimes happen and what can be done to prevent it? (Focus on the Holocaust and subsequent genocides)
(c) If religion did not exist who would miss it? Can religions and beliefs support people in difficult times?

Minimum Learning Outcomes (below / within / secure / exceeding/mastery) for KS3:

Religions & Worldviews a: give different views on how faith may play a vital part in people’s identity;

And d: use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teaching and ethical issues;

Christianity a: describe and compare ways in which different Christian groups express their identity;

Other religion/worldview d: explain why some people are inspired to follow a particular religious or philosophical path;

Throughout: use reasoning and examples to express their own views on how Christianity and other the tradition(s) being studied have affected the world.

Exemplar Scheme of Learning for this unit [TBA]

Assessment Exemplar for this unit

  1. How are religions and beliefs portrayed in the media? [C&E]

This unit explores how big questions of faith and truth are portrayed in a variety of media

 

(a) Is reporting in the local and national press, radio and television on religion and beliefs fair and accurate?
(b) How do religious groups use the media today? What are the potential benefits and problems of this? (E.g. Internet, television, radio, press and arts)
(c) What criteria can we use to analyze the portrayal of religion and beliefs in the media?
(d) How would I portray religion and beliefs through a variety of media?

Minimum Learning Outcomes (below / within / secure / exceeding/mastery) for KS3:

Religions & Worldviews b: give different views on the place of modern media in relation to religion and belief;

And d: use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teachings and ethical issues;

Christianity b: explain how and why examples of creativity may express or challenge Christian beliefs about the Fall, redemption and salvation;

Other religion/worldview b: explain how and why people express beliefs, values and ideas of spirituality through ceremonies, festivals and other creative ways;

Throughout: use reasoning and examples to express their own views on how Christianity and other the tradition(s) being studied have affected the world.

Exemplar Scheme of Learning for this unit

Assessment Exemplar for this unit

  1. How might beliefs affect my thoughts, ideas and actions? [A&F]

This unit explores beliefs affect approaches to moral issues

(a) What codes of behaviour exist in religions and beliefs?
(b) How relevant to modern life are religious values and codes of behaviour?
(c) How might beliefs, values and moral codes apply to ethical situations today?
(d) What are my most important values and codes of behaviour?

Minimum Learning Outcomes (below / within / secure / exceeding/mastery) for KS3:

Religions & Worldviews b: give different views on the place of modern media in relation to religion and belief;

And d: use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teaching and ethical issues;

Christianity d: explain the challenges of the Christian principles of love, forgiveness and trust in God with reference to key texts;

Other religion/worldview c: suggest reasons for similar and different interpretations of scriptures and other important texts;

Throughout: use reasoning and examples to express their own views on how Christianity and other the tradition(s) being studied have affected the world.

Exemplar Scheme of Learning for this unit

Assessment Exemplar for this unit [TBA]

  1. How do people express their beliefs and identities? [C&D]

This unit explores how religions and beliefs express aspects of human nature in a variety of creative ways

 

(a) What are the different ways in which individuals express their sense of identity and key beliefs?
(b) How do faith and belief communities express their identity and key beliefs?
(c) What influences do religious and other leaders have in local, national and global communities?
(d) How might I best express my own identity and beliefs?

Minimum Learning Outcomes (below / within / secure / exceeding/mastery) for KS3:

Religions & Worldviews a: give different views on how faith may play a vital part in people’s identity;

And d: use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teachings and ethical issues;

Christianity a: describe and compare ways in which different Christian groups express their identity;

Other religion/worldview b: explain how and why people express beliefs, values and ideas of spirituality through ceremonies, festivals and other creative ways;

Throughout: use reasoning and examples to express their own views on how Christianity and other the tradition(s) being studied have affected the world.

Exemplar Scheme of Learning for this unit

Assessment Exemplar for this unit

  1. What do people believe about life and the place of religion and beliefs within it? [A&E]

This unit explores ideas about the nature of life on earth and relates them to religious and other beliefs

(a) What might be the different purposes of life on earth?
(b) Why is there suffering in the world?
(c) What beliefs do people have about life after death?
(d) How did the world begin?

Minimum Learning Outcomes (below / within / secure / exceeding/mastery) for KS3:

Religions & Worldviews c: ask questions about the meaning of religion and spirituality and suggest answers relating to the search for truth;

And d: use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teaching and ethical issues;

Christianity c: suggest reasons for different understandings of the resurrection of Jesus that Christians hold and show how they may have an impact on Christians today;

Other religion/worldview c: suggest reasons for similar and different interpretations of scriptures and other important texts;

Throughout: use reasoning and examples to express their own views on how Christianity and other the tradition(s) being studied have affected the world.

Exemplar Scheme of Learning for this unit [TBA]

Assessment Exemplar for this unit [TBA]

  1. What’s to be done? What really matters in religion and beliefs? [B&F]

This unit explores how people’s values and commitments might be demonstrated in the lives of individuals and communities

 

(a) What rights and responsibilities do I have?
(b) Why does there seem to be so much poverty and injustice in the world?
(c) How do religions and beliefs encourage their members to be a force for good in the world? (Religious practices such as prayer, meditation, charitable giving, giving time to those in need, spoken and written advice and guidance, etc)
(d) How do religions and beliefs engage in dialogue with one another?

Minimum Learning Outcomes (below / within / secure / exceeding/mastery) for KS3:

Religions & Worldviews b: give different views on the place of modern media in relation to religion and belief;

And d: use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teachings and ethical issues;

Christianity d: explain the challenges of the Christian principles of love, forgiveness and trust in God with reference to key texts;

Other religion/worldview d: explain why some people are inspired to follow a particular religious or philosophical path;

Throughout: use reasoning and examples to express their own views on how Christianity and other the tradition(s) being studied have affected the world.

Exemplar Scheme of Learning for this unit

Assessment Exemplar for this unit
Characteristics of learning

Throughout Key Stage 3, students extend their understanding of Christianity plus THREE religions/worldviews from Buddhism, Hinduism, Humanism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism in local, national and global contexts. Over Key Stages 3 and 4 as a whole, studies are made of Buddhism, Sikhism and a non-religious worldview such as Humanism. They also revisit prior learning in RE, applying their learning to the key themes being studied. They deepen their understanding of important beliefs, concepts and issues of truth and authority in religion. They apply their understanding of religious and philosophical beliefs, teachings and practices to a range of ultimate questions and moral issues. They enquire into and explain some personal, philosophical, theological and cultural reasons for similarities and differences in religious beliefs and values, both within and between religions. They consider how the media portray religion in the modern world. They develop their evaluative skills, showing reasoned and balanced viewpoints, when considering their own and others’ responses to religious and spiritual issues. They reflect on the impact of religion and belief in the world, considering both the importance of inter-faith dialogue and also the tensions that exist within and between religions. They interpret religious texts and other sources, recognizing both the power and limitations of language and other forms of communication in expressing ideas and beliefs.

 

Experiences and opportunities

  • encountering people from different religious, cultural and philosophical
    groups, who can express a range of convictions on religious and moral issues
  • visiting, where possible, places of major religious significance and using opportunities in ICT to enhance students’ understanding of religion
  • discussing, questioning and evaluating important issues in religion and philosophy, including ultimate questions and ethical issues
  • reflecting upon and carefully evaluating their own beliefs and values and those of others in response to their learning in religious education, using reasoned, balanced arguments
  • using a range of forms of expression (e.g. art, dance, drama and creative writing) to communicate their ideas and responses creatively and thoughtfully
  • exploring the connections between religious education and other subject areas, such as the arts, humanities, literature, science.

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