D02 Standards: The Learning Outcomes

 

D02 LEARNING OUTCOMES IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

Introduction

The Learning Outcomes listed in the following pages move ‘beyond levels’ to include more specific attention to the content of the RE curriculum. They are designed to provide guidance on how well pupils are doing in different areas of RE enquiry and what they must do to next to make progress.

The Learning Outcomes are designed to help pupils:

·      keep track of their own progress;

·      set themselves targets for improvement;

·      assess their own and their peers’ learning.

 

The Learning Outcomes are designed to help teachers:

·      plan suitable RE activities (that may be assessed);

·      ensure that RE planning is progressive over time;

·      meet pupils’ learning needs, e.g., in matching tasks to pupils’ abilities and identifying areas for further attention;

·      provide challenging targets for pupils;

·      diagnose and report on pupils’ progress in relation to the Big Ideas in RE;

·      ensure there is ‘good RE’ going on in cross-curricular or topic-based projects across a school or year group;

·      support the schools’ overall strategy in providing a broad and balanced picture of individual pupils’ educational progress.

 

 

They are MINIMUM expectations.

Teachers and pupils should not be limited by the statements given here. The Learning Outcomes provide a reference for the ‘Big Ideas’, both in religious education and in the religious and non-religious worldviews being studied, but teaching and learning can and should go much deeper.

At each phase, pupils will deepen their knowledge and understanding and this will be shown in the development of their abilities to interpret, apply and evaluate the material being studied.
Understanding and using the Learning Outcomes

The expected Learning Outcomes for each key stage are listed in three sections:

  • Investigation of religious and non-religious worldviews
  • Knowledge and understanding of Christianity
  • Knowledge and understanding of religions or worldviews other than Christianity

These three sections reflect:

  • the National Curriculum Framework for RE (NCFRE) statements about the aims and breadth of RE, in particular, to help pupils know about, understand and express ideas and insights into the nature, significance and impact of religious and non-religious worldviews[1] and
  • the legal requirement of RE syllabuses not designated with a religious character, to ‘reflect the fact that the religious traditions in Great Britain are in the main Christian, whilst taking account of the teaching and practices of the other principal religions represented in Great Britain’[2].

The Learning Outcomes listed in the following pages (except for the Early Years Foundation Stage), are linked with units in the AMV programme of study, and these appear in orange type after each statement. The Learning Outcomes relevant to each unit also appear underneath the enquiry questions in the Programmes of Study.

There are now assessment exemplars for each unit of the programme of study and each of these shows how the Learning Outcomes can be tested in assessable activities. The assessment exemplars are found here.

A recent report on assessment[3] commended models of assessment that involved teachers in making simple judgements about whether pupils were ‘exploring’, ‘meeting’ or ‘exceeding’ targeted levels of knowledge and understanding. An alternative way of expressing this is in the 3 ‘e’s of ‘emerging – expected – exceeding’, or the 3 ‘w’s of ‘working towards’, ‘working at’ or working beyond’. Yet another model requires judgements in relation to expected standards as being ‘below’, ‘within’, ‘secure’ or ‘exceeding/mastery’.

These models could be used in a fairly straightforward way by using the ‘outcomes’ listed above as staging posts for pupils’ progress.

Suppose that a programme of study in RE follows the pattern given above, focusing investigations on the areas of enquiry, whether of a single tradition or across a number of different traditions. The class teacher can then provide on-going feedback on how well each pupil is doing in respect of the outcomes.

For example, to give feedback on a pupil’s progress in their understanding of Christianity at the end of key Stage 1, a task may have been set for pupils to show that they can recall the key features of the Easter story (such as a picture-sort exercise). The teacher needs to evaluate how well pupils have responded to the task: and to make a judgement about whether each pupil’s response meets the expectation that they can ‘recall the key features of the Easter story’. If there work is judged almost to reach that standard their response may be judged as ‘emerging’ or ‘working towards’; if it not only meets, but goes beyond the expectation, then it may be judged as ‘exceeding’ or ‘working beyond’ the expectation.

It will be crucial that tasks and challenges are set for pupils to demonstrate their knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to the criteria. By building such challenges into the scheme of work, teachers will be able to focus on the information that is useful for pupils, parents, school leaders and for themselves, in making their teaching more effective.

LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR THE EARLY YEARS FOUNDATION STAGE

Investigation of religious and non-religious worldviews

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to:

  1. talk about what items and people are important to them and to other people;
  2. show awareness and sensitivity towards their own and others’ needs, views and feelings;
  3. show awareness of how people can care for living beings;
  4. respect their own and others’ ways of life.

Knowledge and understanding of Christianity

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to:

  1. talk about a story about Jesus or a story Jesus told that illustrates Christian concern for the outsider or the marginalised;
  2. talk about the creation and how some Christians show their care for the natural world;
  3. recognise some items found in a church that are connected with important Christian beliefs or practices;
  4. recall at least one person associated with the life of a church.

Knowledge and understanding of religions or worldviews other than Christianity

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to: [for example, depending on selected tradition]:

  1. talk about a story from the religion or worldview being studied;
  2. talk about the natural world and how care is shown for all living things;
  3. recognise some items that are connected with important beliefs or practices;
  4. recall at least one person associated with the life of the religion or worldview being studied.


LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR KEY STAGE 1

Investigation of religious and non-religious worldviews

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to:

  1. talk about what is important to them and to other people with respect for feelings; [Units 3, 4, 6]
  2. talk about some things about people, that make people ask questions; [Units 2, 5, 9]
  3. ask their own questions about God/deity, special people and special occasions; [Units 1, 7, 8]
  4. provide a good reason for the views they have and the connections they make. [All Units]

Knowledge and understanding of Christianity

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to:

  1. recall some of the ways in which Christmas and Easter are celebrated in different ways by different Christians; [Units 4, 5]
  2. recall the key features of the Gospel stories of Christmas and Easter; [Units 2, 9]
  3. say something about how Christians talk about a relationship with God; [Units 1, 7, 8]
  4. say something about how and why Christians try to help others; [Units 3, 6, 9]
  5. provide a good reason for the views they have and the connections they make. [All Units]

Knowledge and understanding of religions or worldviews other than Christianity

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to: [for example, depending on selected tradition]:

  1. recall stories about an inspirational person; [Units 1, 4]
  2. recall key features of an inspirational event, place, ritual or special occasion; [Units 2, 7]
  3. say how stories in a selected tradition are inspirational for believers; [Units 5, 8]
  4. say something about how and why followers of this tradition try to help others; [Units 3, 6]
  5. provide a good reason for the views they have and the connections they make. [All Units]


 

LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR LOWER KEY STAGE 2

Investigation of religious and non-religious worldviews

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to:

  1. compare different ideas about God and humanity in the traditions studied; [Units 1, 7, 8]
  2. ask important questions about the practice of faith and compare some different possible answers; [Units 2, 4, 5]
  3. link their own ideas about how to lead a good life to the teachings of religions and beliefs being studied; [Units 3, 6, 9]
  4. provide good reasons for the views they have and the connections they make. [All Units]

Knowledge and understanding of Christianity

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to:

  1. describe what Christians might learn about Jesus from the Gospel stories of miracles and his resurrection; [Units 2, 4, 9]
  2. describe some of the different ways in which different Christians show their beliefs in creation, incarnation and salvation, including through the arts, worship and helping others; [Units 5, 7, 8]
  3. describe a way in which some Christians work together locally; [Units 1, 6]
  4. describe the importance of the Bible for Christians and give examples of how it is used; [Units 3, 5]
  5. provide good reasons for the views they have and the connections they make. [Units 1-9]

Knowledge and understanding of religions or worldviews other than Christianity

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to: [for example, depending on selected tradition]:

  1. describe what believers might learn from the significant texts/writings being studied; [Units 1, 6, 8, 9]
  2. describe what some of the arts in the tradition being studied might mean to believers; [Units 3, 5, 7]
  3. describe some of the rules and guidance used by believers and how that might be applied in working with others from different traditions; [Units 10, 11, 12]
  4. describe the importance of key texts/writings in the tradition being studied and give an example of how they may be used; [Units 10, 11, 12]
  5. provide good reasons for the views they have and the connections they make. [Units 1, 3, 5-12]

LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR UPPER KEY STAGE 2

Investigation of religious and non-religious worldviews

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to:

  1. describe and explain different ideas about God with reference to two religions or one religion and a non-religious worldview; [Units 7, 8]
  2. ask important questions about religious experience and life after death and suggest answers that refer to traditions of religion and belief; [Units 1, 2, 4, 5]
  3. ask important questions about social issues and suggest what might happen depending on different moral choices; [Units 3, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12]
  4. provide good reasons for the views they have and the connections they make. [All Units]

Knowledge and understanding of Christianity

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to:

  1. make links between Jesus’ life and teaching and different forms of Christian action, such as in rituals and charitable acts; [Units 6, 9]
  2. describe and compare different ideas Christians may have about developing their relationship with God, through prayer, pilgrimage or personal ‘spiritual’ experience; [Units 1, 4, 5]
  3. describe how Christians express beliefs about Jesus as ‘Son of God’ and ‘Saviour’ in worship and art; [Units 3, 7]
  4. describe and compare different ideas Christians may have about salvation and life after death with reference to key texts; [Units 2, 8]
  5. provide good reasons for the views they have and the connections they make. [Units 1-9]

Knowledge and understanding of religions or worldviews other than Christianity

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to: [for example, depending on selected tradition]:

  1. make links between some texts and symbols from religion and belief and guidance on how to live a good life; [Units 1, 3, 6, 9]
  2. describe and compare how important aspects of a religion or belief are celebrated and remembered by different communities; [Units 10, 11, 12]
  3. describe and compare different ways of demonstrating a commitment to a tradition of religion and belief; [Units 10, 11, 12]
  4. describe and compare different ideas from the tradition being studied about the meanings of life and death with reference to key texts; [Units 5, 7, 8]
  5. provide good reasons for the views they have and the connections they make. [Units 1, 3, 5-12]


LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR KEY STAGE 3

Investigation of religious and non-religious worldviews

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to:

  1. give different views on how faith may play a vital part in people’s identity; [Units 1, 4, 7]
  2. give different views on the place of modern media in relation to religion and belief; [Units 5, 6, 9]
  3. ask questions about the meaning of religion and spirituality and suggest answers relating to the search for truth; [Units 2, 3, 8]
  4. use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teachings and ethical issues. [All Units]

Knowledge and understanding of Christianity

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to:

  1. describe and compare ways in which different Christian groups express their identity; [Units 4, 7]
  2. explain how and why examples of creativity may express or challenge Christian beliefs about the Fall, redemption and salvation; [Units 3, 5]
  3. suggest reasons for different understandings of the resurrection of Jesus that Christians hold and show how they may have an impact on Christians today; [Units 1, 8]
  4. explain the challenges of the Christian principles of love, forgiveness and trust in God with reference to key texts; [Units 2, 6, 9]
  5. use reasoning and examples to express their own views on how Christianity has affected the world. [All Units]

Knowledge and understanding of religions or worldviews other than Christianity

By the end of this stage, as a MINIMUM requirement, pupils will be taught to: [for example, depending on selected tradition]:

  1. describe and compare different interpretations of religious identity; [Units 1, 4]
  2. explain how and why people express beliefs, values and ideas of spirituality through ceremonies, festivals and other creative ways; [Units 2, 3, 7]
  3. suggest reasons for similar and different interpretations of scriptures and other important texts; [Units 6, 8]
  4. explain why some people are inspired to follow a particular religious or philosophical path; [Units 5, 9]
  5. use reasoning and examples to express their own views on how the tradition being studied has affected the world. [All Units]

[1] REC, 2013, ‘Religious Education: a National Curriculum Framework’ in A Review of Religious Education in England, p.14.

[2] Education Act, 1996, Chapter III, 375:3

[3] NAHT, 2014. Report of the NAHT Commission on Assessment. Haywards Heath: NAHT.

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