F05 Guidance: Support for teaching RE in the EYFS

F05 SUPPORT FOR TEACHING RELIGIOUS EDUCATION WITHIN THE EARLY YEARS FOUNDATION STAGE (EYFS)

 

The Legal Situation

The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) is a term defined in Section 39 of the Childcare Act 2006.

Religious education remains compulsory for all registered pupils in full-time education (except for those withdrawn at parental request). This includes children of four or five years old in reception or mixed reception classes but excludes children in designated nursery classes or nursery schools.

Children in reception classes, MUST receive religious education in accordance with the requirements of the appropriate syllabus, regardless of whether or not it is the term in which they will reach their fifth birthday. The appropriate syllabus for community and voluntary controlled (VC) schools is the locally agreed syllabus (‘Awareness Mystery and Value’). Voluntary aided (VA) schools should follow the syllabus required by their trust deed. For Church of England VA schools within the Diocese of Bath & Wells this is an amended version of ‘Awareness Mystery and Value’. Academies and free schools, under the terms of their funding agreement, must provide religious education for al registered pupils; this will be according to the foundation of the school – either consistent with the law on agreed syllabuses or with the arrangements made by the religious foundation if it is a school/academy with a religious character.

 

Aims of RE

The aim of RE in the foundation stage is essentially the same as that in other stages of a child’s education, namely, ‘to learn about and learn from religious and spiritual insights, beliefs and practices.’ During the foundation stage children begin to explore the world of religion in terms, for example, of special people, books, times, places and objects, and visiting places of worship. Children listen to and talk about stories. They are introduced to specialist worlds and use their senses in exploring religious beliefs, practices and forms of expression. They reflect upon their own feelings and experiences. They use their imagination and curiosity to develop their appreciation and wonder of the world in which they live. (See DFES/QCA, 2004, Non-Statutory National Framework for RE.)

The six areas of enquiry of the agreed syllabus provide a focus for the beginnings of children’s learning in RE. The six areas may be seen, at the foundation stage, as helping children to think about:

  1. beliefs, including religious beliefs;
  2. the things people say and do, including religious people;
  3. ways of expressing ideas, including examples of religious expression;
  4. their experiences and their identity;
  5. the wonders and mysteries of life;
  6. helpfulness and selfishness.

Not all of these six areas require coverage in reception classes, though it is possible to touch on them all through careful selection of learning opportunities from the ‘Awareness Mystery and Value’ (AMV) programmes of study.

 

The contribution of religious education to the early learning goals

In line with the DfE’s 2013 EYFS Profile, RE should, through planned purposeful play and through a mix of adult-led and child-initiated activity, provide appropriate learning opportunities for pupils in the following areas:

The areas of learning identified in the early Learning Goals are:

  • personal, social and emotional development (PSED);
  • communication and language (CL);
  • mathematics (Ma);
  • literacy (Li);
  • understanding the world (UW);
  • expressive arts and design (EAD).

Religious education can make a limited contribution to mathematics, but a major contribution to all the other areas.

About the examples given in this document

The sample activities provided in the following pages attempt to make connections between the aims of RE as listed on the previous page, and the areas of learning listed above.

The examples given are consistent with the philosophy of Early Years Specialist, Gill Vaisey: ‘Religious education must be meaningful and appropriate and therefore careful selection of resources and contexts for learning is essential. Provision of religious education should be consistent with good practice in the rest of the curriculum for this age group. It should therefore be largely based on active involvement in first hand experiences. Good RE-focussed activities will provide opportunities to develop imaginative play, language and mathematical skills, music making and creative artwork. As well making a significant contribution to knowledge and understanding of the world, and their personal, social and emotional development, good religious education will also provide valuable opportunities to widen the pupils’ cultural awareness and experiences and develop an awareness of a spiritual dimension to life.’

Unit 1: Who Are We?                                                                                                                                                         Focus Areas A&D
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2 for key)

(a)  Who and what is special to me? (People, places, experiences, feelings, stories, objects, beliefs, values). ·       Make comparisons between themselves and others – David says he is the smallest in his family.

·       Respond to religious pictures and artefacts and talk about how they feel.

·       Ask children about what makes them who they are: names, appearance, whether they feel well or ill, family etc.

·       Use a mystery bag to reveal something special to people with religious beliefs, e.g., Ganesha (Gift to the Child) for Hindus.

·       Talk about who and what is special to them and show pictures of different types of wonders in the natural world.

·       Scribe children’s ideas on the ‘best things in the world’ ready for an interactive book.

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs. (CL)

 

(b)  Who and what supports and guides us? (People, experiences, feelings, beliefs, values, ideas). ·       Make cards of appreciation for visitors, helpers, each other.

·       Max said: ‘We can be helpful by clearing away our things when we are finished so everything is ready for the next person’.

·       Having looked at pictures of Rama and Sita, Ashley says: ‘He looks brave and strong’.

·       Andrew says, ‘People go to church because they want to see other Christians.’

·       All children add some ideas to the interactive book, ‘Who Are We?’

·       Invite ‘People who help us’ to the class to help children think about the viewpoint of others.

·       Give affirmation that helps children to understand why people do things differently from each other.

·       Talk about going to a place of worship: who goes? Where are the nearest ones? What happens there? Add children’s voices onto Easy Speak for the class interactive book.

·       Use Puddles Lends a Paw (see resources), to show how people help in a church.

·       Ask a local religious leader to talk about her/his job and role in the community.

·       Talk about their own and others’ behaviour and its consequences. (PSED)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role-play and stories. (EAD)

Unit 1: Who Are We? (cont.)                                                                                                                                            Focus Areas A&D  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(c)  What makes us joyful, peaceful, wonder, reflective, happy and sad? (Experiences, places, celebrations, stories, songs and, for some people, prayers). ·       Notice and comment on the feelings of others, e.g. Sam says: ‘What’s the matter with Mrs Owen – she looks very worried’.

·       Patrick says that Tom hurt his feelings when he broke up his Lego model.

·       Take delight in being chosen as a ‘special person’.

·       After a silent reflection on the different people in the world, Jason says, ‘Every one is just the same.. underneath.’

·       Make a collection of photographs of children displaying different emotions.

·       Provide opportunities for children to work in pairs, mirroring facial expressions.

·       Use stories to explore how characters feel, e.g. Elmer or Titch.

·       Acknowledge children’s feelings and help them to respond to each other’s.

·       Create a sense of occasion through the use of music and candles.

·       Provide moments of reflection during or at the end of a story.

·       Record their thoughts onto Easy Speak after times of stillness.

·       Show pictures and talk about prayer and meditation in different religions.

·       Talk about their own and others’ behaviour and its consequences. (PSED)

·       Talk about how they and others show feelings. (PSED)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. Show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role-play and stories. (EAD)

 
(d)  How might stories, prayers, songs, etc help us understand more about ourselves and ideas of God? ·       Take their cue from the music and the lighting of a candle that it is a special time.

·       Paige says: ‘That was a kind thing to do’, after hearing the story Dogger.

·       Following a visit by the Lifeboat team, Gemma wrote a prayer asking God to watch over seafarers.

·       Yasmin and Ali talk about the universe and Ali says, ‘If God made the world, who made God?’

·       Share religious stories, e.g. The Boy with Stars in His Mouth and discuss how ideas of God are represented in words or pictures.

·       Sing songs which illustrate similarities and differences, e.g. If I were a butterfly.

·       Share stories looking at aspects of God, e.g. Who’s a friend of the water-spurting whale, and songs, e.g. God made the world and God made me.

·       Encourage children to paint/draw the things God is believed to have made in the stories and songs.

·       Talk about how they and others show feelings. (PSED)

·       Listen attentively in a range of situations. Listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions. (CL)

·       Represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role-play and stories. (EAD)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

 

 
Unit 2: Why are some times special?                                                                                                                           Focus Areas B&E  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(a)  What special times and seasons can I remember? Why were these times special? ·       After moving house, Cathy said: ‘I’ve got a new bedroom and my Gran and Granddad came to see me’.

·       When role-playing a birthday party: ‘No!   You sing Happy Birthday before you blow the candles out!’ said Harry.

·       Encourage children to talk with each other about similarities and differences in their experiences and the reasons for those similarities and differences.

·       Encourage children to talk about how they feel, for example after a disagreement, when they are excited at seeing snow, or at the birth of a sibling.

·       Provide suitable resources and stimuli for role-play.

 

·       Are confident to try new activities, and say why they like some activities more than others. Are confident to speak in a familiar group, will talk about their ideas. (PSED)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Use part, present and future forms accurately when talking about events that have happened or are to happen in the future (CL)

 
(b)  Why are some festivals and celebrations special?

i.       When do they happen?

ii.      What do they remember?

iii.     What do people do and why?

·       After listening to the Christmas story, Jenny and Mark show excitement as the nativity figures are unpacked for the first time.

·       After listening to the story of The Buddha’s Birthday, Hannah asks why Aung walks around the stupa three times.

·       Keziah made a diva lamp and said ‘Can I light it and put it in the window?’

 

·       Provide opportunities for children to acknowledge and respond to others’ feelings about different festivals and celebrations.

·       Give information that helps children to understand why people do things differently from each other, and encourage children to talk about these differences.

·       Read stories from a range of cultures, e.g. The Buddha’s Birthday.

·       Use a range of activities such as role play to engage children in different aspects of various festivals and celebrations.

·       Are confident to try new activities, and say why they like some activities more than others. Are confident to speak in a familiar group, will talk about their ideas. (PSED)

·       Know that children don’t always enjoy the same things and are sensitive to this. (UW)

·       Develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events. (CL)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

 
Unit 2: Why are some times special?   (cont.)                                                                                                            Focus Areas B&E  
(c)  What special objects might be used in festivals and celebrations? ·       On a visit to the church, Jack points out the advent candle.

·       Children may become quiet and still when the candle is lit.

·       From a display of Jewish artefacts, Chantelle puts the mezuzah on the classroom door and says, ‘This is where it goes.’

·       When she finished making her Diva lamp, Keziah said, ‘I am going to stick sequins on like in the video.’

·       Provide opportunities for children to see and touch a range of artefacts and handle them with respect.

·       Use a ‘Storybag’ ® to stimulate children’s curiosity (see resources).

·       Create a sense of occasion when looking at some artefacts.

·       Take an interest in what and how children think and not just what they know.

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Know that children don’t always enjoy the same things and are sensitive to this. (UW)

·       Know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things. (UW)

 

 
(d)  How might some stories and practices associated with religious and other festivals and celebrations relate to experiences and feelings in our own lives? ·       After looking at pictures in the story of ‘The Buddha’s Birthday’, Judy brought in a photograph of her wearing her new party dress at her birthday.

·       After listening to the story of The Buddha’s Birthday, Charlie makes invitations for everyone to come to a class party. When icing the class party cake, Kristine says: ‘On my birthday I helped Daddy decorate my cake’.

·       When lighting the class advent candle, Charlene says: ‘It’s the count-down to Christmas and I can’t wait for Christmas to come!’

·       Provide opportunities for children to reflect on feelings and experiences.

·       Give information that helps children to understand why people do things differently from each other, and encourage children to talk about these differences.

·       Ask children to give reasons, further explanations or evidence for what they say.

·       Encourage children to talk about how they feel, for example after a disagreement, when they are excited at seeing snow, or at the birth of a sibling.

·       Talk to children about how to plan a class celebration or party.

·       Develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events. (CL)

·       Answer “how” and “why” questions about their experiences. (CL)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

 
Unit 3: Why are some stories special?                                                                                                             Focus Areas C&F  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(a)  What stories and books are special to me and my family? ·       Ella brings a book in for the class collection and says, ‘This is my Gran’s favourite story’.

 

·       Provide opportunities for children to bring in special books to contribute to a class collection and talk about why they are special.

·       Model language and feelings by talking about their special books e.g. this is a very beautiful old family book that my family has had for a long, long time.

·       Answer “how” and “why” questions about their experiences. (CL)

·       Give their attention to what others say and respond appropriately. (CL)

 

 
(b)  What stories and books are special to people within religions and beliefs? ·       re-enact a story they have heard and show through their role play an understanding of the story and its meaning.

·       Kurt very tenderly helped Sophie from the ground when re-enacting The Good Samaritan.

·       After listening to the story of The House on the Rock, Maya played with a Lego house outside on the playground and in the sand tray. She said, ’The house kept falling over in the sand, it wasn’t very strong.’

·       Tell a story with a clear message from the Bible or other religious book, e.g. The Good Samaritan, The Lost Sheep and provide opportunities for them to explore the meaning.

·       Enable opportunities for role- playing stories; developing role-play in small groups on related scenarios, e.g. someone needs help; someone cares.

·       Ask children to reflect on, give reasons, further explanations or evidence for what they say.

·       Elicit talk during play related to the meaning of stories.

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Listen attentively in a range of situations. Listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions. (CL)

 
Unit 3: Why are some stories special? (cont.)                                                                                                            Focus Areas C&F
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

(c)  How are stories told and books used within religions and beliefs? ·       William told everyone the story of what happened to him at the weekend and says: ‘When I was lost my mummy came and looked for me in the supermarket.’

·       Frank brings in a book that belonged to his mum and says: ‘This was my Mum’s favourite book when she was little’.

·       Cathy shows her recipe book and demonstrates how her Dad uses it. ‘My Dad always uses this book to help him cook our favourite tea’, she says.

·       After hearing the story of ‘The Good Samaritan’ and ‘The Lost Coin, Sam says ‘Jesus told these stories.’

·       Provide opportunities for children to hear and respond to stories from the Bible and stories that tell people about how to live, e.g. The Good Samaritan, stories that tell people about what God is like, e.g. The Lost Sheep.

·       Encourage children to relate and reflect on their own experiences.

·       Tell stories to expand a theme based on human experiences, e.g. The Lost Sheep – showing God’s love for us and our specialness to him – Dogger – Dave’s love for Dogger and his specialness – parents’ love for children – children’s love for each other/toys.

·       Ask questions to elicit talk and reflection about why a story might be significant.

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Listen attentively in a range of situations. Listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions. (CL)

 

(d)  What do some stories and books say about how people should live? ·       Ellie says: ‘I saw a Bible at Ali’s Christening, it was silver.’

·       Tom brings in his video of Jonah and the Whale and says, ‘We watched this at my club.’

·       Jack says: ‘I know that story, my Mum read it to me at bed-time’.

·       Stuart looks at Frank’s book and handles it carefully because he is aware that it is important to someone else.

·       Make explicit where the stories being used come from.

·       Modelling how books should be handled.

·       Provide opportunities for the children to talk about where they have seen the books or heard the stories before.

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Know that children don’t always enjoy the same things and are sensitive to this. (UW)

Unit 4: Where do we belong?                                                                                                                                          Focus Areas B&D  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(a)  Where do I belong? (Feelings, experiences) ·       Harry comes over in great excitement and says: ‘My Nanny’s taking us all to the park.’

·       Sam chooses things to go in his ‘family box’ saying: ‘I’m putting in this car because Dad had it when he was little.’

·       Liam says: ’I like playing with Jake and Yaseen because we run the fastest.’

·       Summer brings in her new swimming goggles and explains how she uses them at her swimming club.

·       Give information that helps children to understand why people do things differently from each other, and encourage children to talk about these differences

·       Support children in the making of a ‘family box’ and during the unit allow opportunities for sharing what the children place in them.

·       ‘Map’ the different groups children belong to.

·       Help children connect the feelings they might experience to particular situations in their lives.

·       Work as part of a group or class, and understand and follow the rules, play co-operatively, taking turns with others. (PSED)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

 

 
(b)  Where do people belong? (Family, local community, group, club, place, country, faith) ·       William says: ‘When I was in playgroup I had to wear a red jumper, now I’ve got a purple one with a horse on it’ (describing school uniform).

·       On the way back from collective worship Amy says: ‘We sing that song at my Sunday School.’

·       Toby says to a visitor whilst looking at class photos: ‘Look, that’s me in that picture.’

·       Jordan picks up an artefact from the table and says, ‘This is a kippah, like in the story.’

·       Help to put together a class photograph album and give children opportunities to reflect on the times when ‘We all ……’

·       Encourage children to share things that are important to them outside of school connected with families and/or groups.

·       Use books, pictures, videos so that children encounter different types of groups (communities that children may or may not have encountered – these may be religious, secular, geographic differences, cultural etc).

·       Use ‘Homing In’ (see resources) to make a Christian, or Jewish, or Muslim or Hindu ‘home corner’.

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Talk about past and present events in their own lives and in the lives of family members. (UW)

 

 

 
Unit 4: Where do we belong? (cont.)                                                                                                                             Focus Areas B&D  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(c)  What do people do because they belong to a faith or belief community? ·       Whilst make Challah loaves and share them, Jordan says: ‘Jacob had this kind of bread in the story.’

·       Joe shows a visitor to the office and explains that this is Mrs Brown the secretary who answers the phone.

·       Peter shows a picture of his Grandfather ringing the church bells and says, ‘My Granddad does this every week in the church with his friends.’

·       Develop children’s knowledge of cultures and beliefs, for example by looking at books, listening to stories from different cultures and languages, handling artefacts, inviting visitors in from various religious and cultural groups and visiting places of worship and cultural centres where appropriate.

·       Use a treasure box of special things to share.

·       Support children in making links between their own experiences and those of others.

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Work as part of a group or class, and understand and follow the rules. Adjust their behaviour to different situations. (PSED)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

 

 
(d)  How might ideas of family and community be reflected in our own lives? · · ·  
Unit 5: How do we celebrate our journey through life?                                                                                             Focus Areas C&E  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(a)  How do people celebrate the important events in their lives? (Birth, naming ceremonies, coming of age, joining a group, marriage, death) ·       Following a visit by the nursery children Ellie says: ‘When I came to school I felt shy’.

·       Danielle brings in an ante-natal scan and tells her friends about her new baby.

·       Sam says ‘When I’m 6 I’m going to go to Beavers with my brother.’

·       Encourage children to ask questions about events in each other’s lives in discussions and explore these through role play.

·       Provide reference material for children to use, for example books, photographs and interviewing visitors and encourage children to bring in their own materials.

·       Use stories that introduce a sense of time and key events in people’s lives, e.g. Titch.

·       Make a collection of cards marking occasions, e.g. moving house, wedding, Christening, Eid, driving test, exams, new job, etc.

·       Talk about past and present events in their own lives and in the lives of family members. (UW)

·       Answer “how” and “why” questions about their experiences. (CL)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

 

 
(b)  How do members of a religious faith celebrate these milestones in the journey of life? ·       After Samantha has shown the class her bridesmaid’s photos Amber said: ‘My neighbour got married and she wore a sari’.

·       After looking at photographs in a big book about a Hindu wedding, Holly painted a pattern on her hand to look like the person in the picture.

·       Look at wedding photos brought in by children within the school and examples from cultures outside children’s immediate experience.

·       Develop children’s knowledge of cultures and beliefs, for example by looking at books, listening to stories from different cultures and languages, handling artefacts, inviting visitors in from various religious and cultural groups and visiting places of worship and cultural centres where appropriate.

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

 

 
Unit 5: How do we celebrate our journey through life? (cont.)                                                                                Focus Areas C&E  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(c)  What artefacts, symbols and ceremonies are used at significant times? ·       Joe brought in his Christening candle. Tom said: ‘I haven’t got one of those because I wasn’t Christened.’

·       On his birthday, Jordan explains that he will need one more candle on his cake.

·       Provide opportunities for children to bring in special artefacts e.g. 1st birthday card; Christening candle.

·       Visit a local place of worship to search for particular symbols and artefacts.

·       Explore with the children the concept that ideas, objects, feelings etc. can be represented by symbols

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things. (UW)

 
(d)  Why are some times in life significant or special? ·       During the class party to welcome their new teddy, Jonti gives teddy a card and saying: ‘I promise not to hurt you’.

·       When planning a class celebration David says: ‘I had a Christening cake, can we make a cake for teddy?’ Shanice says: ‘I want to call teddy Shanice.’

·       Harry told the class how he put some flowers on his Gran’s grave at the weekend. He explains: ‘Mum says we put the flowers there so we can remember her.’

·       Ask children to reflect on, give reasons, further explanations or evidence for what they say.

·       Organise a class celebration with the children to mark a milestone in life, e.g. naming ceremony for new teddy:

·       give him a name

·       make a promise – ‘I promise to cuddle you’

·       make him a costume to wear

·       make special food

·       make special hats to wear.

·       Answer “how” and “why” questions about their experiences. (CL)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

 

 
Unit 6: How should we live our lives?                                                                                                                            Focus Areas A&F  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(a)  How does what I do affect other people? ·       When coming in after play, Callum says to the teacher: ‘I bumped into Cheryl but I did say sorry.’

·       Maia said: ‘My mum gets cross when I won’t go to bed.’

·       Ensure that children and adults make opportunities to listen to each other and explain their actions.

·       Encourage children to share their feelings and talk about why they respond to experiences in particular ways.

·       Provide opportunities for children to acknowledge and respond to each other’s feelings, e.g. circle time, ‘think books’, paired talk, role play.

·       Talk about their own and others’ behaviour, and its consequences and know that some behaviour is unacceptable. (PSED)

·       Answer “how” and “why” questions about their experiences. (CL)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

 

 
(b)  What rules and codes of behaviour help me know what to do? ·       On the playground children use ‘pretend’ roadsigns and make chalk markings to direct each other’s behaviour on the bikes.   John said: ‘Stop, don’t cross the road – the crossing man is red.’

·       When discussing how to make the classroom a happy place, Oliver said: ‘Don’t run inside because you’ll hurt yourself.’

·       Involve children in agreeing codes of behaviour and taking responsibility for their implementation.

·       Encourage children to explore rules and codes through role-play.

·       Tell stories that help children identify and discuss rules and codes of behaviour, e.g. ‘It was Jake’.

·       Work as part of a group or class, and understand and follow the rules, play co-operatively, taking turns with others. (PSED)

·       Talk about their own and others’ behaviour, and its consequences and know that some behaviour is unacceptable. (PSED)

 

 
Unit 6: How should we live our lives?     (cont.)                                                                                                 Focus Areas A&F  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(c)  What values are important to me, and how can I show them in how I live? (Fairness, honesty, forgiveness, kindness) ·       After using the big bricks to build a bridge together, the classroom assistant asks: ‘Did you work together well?’   Shane replied: ‘I made this bit and Peter helped me hold the top, just like the monkey in the story.’

·       The teacher drew a picture of the father in the story of the Prodigal Son and asked the children to think of what she could write in a speech bubble.   Melissa suggested: ‘Are you alright?’

·       Read stories from religious traditions and lead talk about and reflection upon moral messages within them. (e.g. The Prodigal Son and ideas about love and caring; The Monkey Bridge and ideas about working for others.)

·       Read fiction books that help explore themes related to behaviour, e.g. It was Jake, So Much, The Rainbow Fish. Make connections to the themes found in the religious traditions.

·       Model language to express and describe feelings.

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Listen attentively in a range of situations. Listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions. (CL)

·       Develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events. (CL)

·       Express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs. (CL)

 
(d)  How do some stories from religions and beliefs and the example set by some people show me what to do? ·       After listen to the beginning of the story of the Rainbow Fish – the children were asked to think about what he should do. Ben said, ‘He should give his scales to the other fish.’

·       After play, Tom said, ‘I let Jack play Power Rangers with us because he had no one to play with.’ The teacher asks Tom to draw a picture of this to add to the class ‘help others’ display.

·       Take advantage of any particular school activities (e.g. Harvest Festival, Children in Need, Blue Peter, Bring & Buy Sale) that exemplify particular values.

·       Tell the story of Guru Nanak and the Jasmine Flower in the ‘Godly / Spirited Play’ style (see resources)

·       Set up activities which require co-operation, fairness and honesty e.g. board games and talk about how children played together.

·       Tell stories that include moral decisions and encourage thinking about what they would do.

·       Celebrate behaviour that demonstrates particular values, such as caring or giving.

·       Talk about their own and others’ behaviour, and its consequences and know that some behaviour is unacceptable. (PSED)

·       Work as part of a group or class, and understand and follow the rules, play co-operatively, taking turns with others. (PSED)

 

 
Unit 7: Why are some places special?                                                                                                                         Focus Areas C&D  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(a)  What places are special to me? Why are they special? ·       Groups of children found the part of the school grounds that they liked the best.

·       Jack painted a picture of the park and said, ‘I love the park. My Dad pushes me high on the swing.’

·       Emma made a postcard and posted it in the class post-box. ‘This is my card from my holiday by the seaside.’

·       Develop a ‘special places’ board – starting with special places for members of staff. After discussion children can be encouraged to bring in photographs or draw / paint places that are special to them. Children could add captions or adults scribe for them.

·       Encourage children to reflect on and describe their feelings about special or favourite places.

·       Answer “how” and “why” questions about their experiences. (CL)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Talk about features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another. (UW)

 
(b)  What places are special to members of a religious or belief community? (Buildings used for worship, special places in the home) ·       ‘Look at me, I’m praying’, says Tania kneeling on a hassock.

·       On a visit to the church, the children keep a sketchbook to record what they see.

·       Jill notices the font in the church and says, ’My baby brother was here and they put some water on his head.’

 

·       Make a model of a place, e.g. a park and talk about the function of each part, e.g. trees, bench, grassy area, slide etc.

·       Take children on a visit to a place of worship and encourage them to question what each area or object is for.

·       Use and collect a variety of images that show examples of different types of religious buildings. Look for similarities and differences.

·       Talk about features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another. (UW)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

 

 
Unit 7: Why are some places special? (cont.)                                                                                                            Focus Areas C&D  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(c)  What do these buildings that are special to religious or belief communities look like?

i.       Do they have special places, objects, pictures or symbols?

ii.      How are these used?

iii.     What do they tell us about what people believe?

·       ‘Look!’ says Michael in the church, ’There’s Noah’s ark in that window.’

·       ‘This is the animal in my story’, said Jake showing his stained glass picture to his friend.

·       In the school hall, Heather says, ‘That’s Jesus on the cross, just like we saw in the church.’

·       Make collections of photographs that show examples of different forms of expression found within local religious buildings.

·       Provide opportunities for children to use dance, drama, music, painting, drawing etc. to communicate a message.

·       Select and use stories with children to help them make connections between various forms of expression and the messages within them.

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role-play and stories. (EAD)

·       Listen attentively in a range of situations. Listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions and actions. (CL)

 

 
  ·       After listening to The Town Mouse and The Country Mouse, Gemma says: ‘I don’t like going to Susan’s – I like it better at home because Lucy and me have got all our toys in our bedroom.’

·       During a visit to the chapel, Darren says, ‘We see all the cars parked here at the weekend, they all sing songs inside.’

·       Read stories about people (or characters) and their special places, e.g. The Town Mouse and The Country Mouse, Frog and Toad.

·       Help children to understand why places are special and why different places are special to different people.

·       Invite people from the community into school to talk about their special places, e.g. local church. Prepare questions with the children.

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Listen attentively in a range of situations. Listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions and actions. (CL)

 

 
Unit 8: Why is our world special?                                                                                                                                   Focus Areas A&E  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(a)  How do I feel about the natural world? (E.g. wonder, amazement, mystery, worry, sadness) ·       Each child in the class planted a daffodil bulb in the school grounds. After looking every day for a long time, Amy says, ‘Look there’s one there now!   Which one is mine?’ George asks, ‘Where did her flower come from?’   ‘Where’s mine gone?’

·       Tamara sat quietly with the class looking at her leaf. Everyone in the class was given a leaf from a tree and asked to examine theirs closely.   (See Don’t Just do something, sit there – Mary K Stone.)

·       Encourage children to ask questions about objects and experiences.

·       Engage children in activities which foster reflection and exploration and express their feelings/ideas about particular objects or situations, e.g. being a seed, stone, leaf, shell.

·       Create a shared, still, quiet atmosphere in the classroom.

·       Make a ‘creation table’ and encourage children to bring in natural objects.

·       Model investigative behaviour and raise questions such as, ‘What do you think?’, ‘Tell me more about…’,’How do you feel?’, ‘What is this like?’

·       Know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things. UW

·       Know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things. (UW)

·       Answer “how” and “why” questions about their experiences and in response to stories and events. (CL)

 

 
(b)  What do songs, poems, prayers and stories say about God as the Creator? ·       After listening to the story of Wonderful World by Nick Butterworth, Freya painted a picture and said, ‘These are some of God’s lovely flowers.’

·       Before the Harvest Festival service, Dottie is heard explaining to Isobella that the service is to say thank you to God.

·       After listening to the story of The Widow with the oil Jolene asks, ‘Where did all that oil come from?’

·       Read, share and discuss stories, poems etc that encourage children to reflect on beliefs about God, e.g. The Widow with the Oil, David and Goliath, The Lost Sheep.

·       Encourage children to think about some meanings within hymns and prayers.

·       Encourage children to contribute their ideas about God and about the natural world.

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs. (CL)

 

 
Unit 8: Why is our world special? (cont.)                                                                                                                      Focus Areas A&E  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(c)  What different ways can I use to show what I think and believe about our world? ·       Kevin looks at the feathers and shells the class has collected from a wood walk and put on the creation table. ‘Can I draw a picture of my shell and put it in our I wonder why? book’, he asks. ‘I wonder why it’s empty?’

·       Alice taps her fingers rapidly on the table to make different ‘sounds of creation.’ She says, ‘This is Brahma creating all the different animals.’

·       Give children opportunities to share and explore their own ideas through painting, talk etc.

·       Encourage children to reflect and ask questions by creating an I wonder why? book.

·       Provide opportunities for children to make their own ‘music of creation’, e.g., matching sounds to a Hindu version of the creation story.

·       Represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role-play and stories. (EAD)

 

 
(d)  How do people show they care / don’t care about our world? ·       When asked to think about how we can care for the school garden, Alex said ‘We can plant seeds and pick up any litter.’ ·       Make a class display of ‘people who care for us’ including what they do to show they care.

·       Make a class-book/display of children’s ideas and thoughts about making the world a nice place to live.

·       Take account of one another’s ideas. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings (PSED)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Know that children don’t always enjoy the same things and are sensitive to this. (UW)

 
Unit 9: Why is Jesus important?                                                                                                                                    Focus Areas B&F  
Agreed Syllabus supplementary questions Examples of what children do What does the practitioner need to do? Early Learning Goals

(areas of learning are indicated in brackets, see p.2)

 
(a)  What people help, inspire and guide me? What makes them special? ·       On the playground Edward said, ‘I am the Lollypop man. I’ll help you cross the road.’

·       The class made a display of paintings showing all the people who help them learn at school.

·       Use circle time to encourage children to think and talk about people who make a difference to their lives.

·       Encourage children to talk with each other about what people actually do to help or guide them.

·       Provide suitable resources and stimuli for role play.

·       Answer “how” and “why” questions about their experiences. (CL)

·       Develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events. (CL)

·       Represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role-play and stories. (EAD)

 
(b)  What do stories from the Bible say about Jesus? (His birth, friends and followers, miracles, parables, death and resurrection) ·       After hearing about one of Jesus’ miracles, Kellie asked, ‘Did he really do that?’

·       Children re-enacted a parable and freeze-framed parts of the story while other children asked questions.

·       Select suitable stories that offer opportunities for reflection and discussion.

·       Tell children a story about Jesus from, e.g., http://www.request.org.uk/

·       Use a variety of activities to stimulate children’s interest and involvement, e.g., role play, making objects, take digital photos of children’s freeze-frames in drama, scribe their ideas for ‘thought bubbles’.

·       Develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events. (CL)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs. (CL)

 
(c)  What things did Jesus say and do that guide people in their lives? What do I think? (e.g. love your neighbour / teachings on love and forgiveness) ·       When he was asked which character in the story of The Lost Sheep was most like Jesus and why, Jacob said, ‘The shepherd, because looked after his sheep.’

·       Children play a blindfold trust game and talk about how it feels to trust someone else. They talk about the feelings of the disciples in The Storm on the Lake.

·       Select stories that have a clear message that children can relate to their own lives, e.g. The Lost Sheep and people who look after them.

·       Tell the story of The Lost Sheep in the ‘Godly / Spirited Play’ style (see resources).

·       Develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events. (CL)

·       Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions. (UW)

·       Express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs. (CL)

 

Suggested resources for Unit 1

Gill Vaisey, Puddles Lends a Paw, Books@Press: www.booksatpress.co.uk.

Easy Speak microphones to record children’s voices: http://www.schoolcare.co.uk/index.php/easi-speak-microphone.html

Sanna Anderson Baker and Tomie De Paola, 1987, Who’s a Friend of the Water Spurting Whale, David C Cook Pub Co, ISBN: 0891915877.

Lynne Broadbent and John Logan,1999, The Tallest Candle, Religious and Moral Education Press, ISBN: 978-1-85175-293-5.

Lynne Broadbent and John Logan, 2009, The Boy with Stars in His Mouth, Religious and Moral Education Press, ISBN: 978-1-85175-367-3.

Shirley Hughes, Dogger, Red Fox, ISBN: 009992790 X.

Pam Hutchins, 1997, Titch, Red Fox, ISBN: 061319239 7.

David McKee, Elmer, Red Fox, ISBN: 009969720 3.

Amelia Rosato, 1992, Isn’t God great!, John Hunt Ltd., ISBN: 185608093 5.

Jessica Souhami, Rama and the Demon King, Frances Lincoln Ltd., ISBN: 071121158 2.

Nancy Sweetland God’s quiet things, Lion, ISBN: 074594889 8.

Suggested resources for Unit 2

Margaret Barrett, The Buddha’s Birthday, Heinemann Bridges to Religions, ISBN: 043530407 0.

‘Storybags’ ® (a bag containing artefacts, books, puppets, etc, about a festival or celebration) – obtainable from Articles of Faith – or make your own!

Suggested resources for Unit 3

Nick Butterworth and Mick Inkpen, 1996, Stories Jesus Told: Omnibus Edition, Zondervan Publishing.

Children’s Bible.

Bhagavad-Gita.

Holy Qur’an, or My First Qur’an: Storybook, Goodword, ISBN 81-7898-554-3

Hebrew Bible.

Shirley Hughes, Dogger, Red Fox, ISBN: 009992790 X.

Suggested resources for Unit 4

Artefacts from selected religion(s).

Angela Wood et al, 1998, Homing In: a practical resource for religious education, Trentham Books.

Suggested resources for Unit 5

Photographs or posters of weddings in different cultures.

Artefacts from selected religion(s).

Pam Hutchins, 1997, Titch, Red Fox, ISBN: 061319239 7.

Suggested resources for Unit 6

For story of The Prodigal Son, see Animated Bible Video, Channel 4 Learning.

For version of The Monkey Bridge, see Essex CC Education, A Long time ago in a faraway land…, ISBN 0 9044 2866 4.

Trish Cooke, 1996, So Much, Walker Books, ISBN: 074454396 7.

Anita Jeram, 1992, It was Jake, Walker Books, ISBN: 031646120 2

Marcus Pfister, 2001,The Rainbow Fish, North-South Books, ISBN: 155858441 2 (Big Book); ISBN: 331421388 3 (Eng/Fr Edition).

Spirited Play exemplified for NATRE members at http://www.natre.org.uk/bigpicture/pages/kq1_film1.php

Suggested resources for Unit 7

Pictures of places of worship.

Images of items inside places of worship, e.g., from REonline: http://www.reonline.org.uk/

Helen Craig, 1999, The Town Mouse and The Country Mouse, Walker Books, ISBN: 0744572231.

Arnold Lobel, 2004, The Frog and Toad Collection, HarperTrophy, ISBN 0060580860.

Suggested resources for Unit 8

Mary K Stone, 1995, Don’t just do something, sit there, RMEP, ISBN: 1 85175 105 X.

For story of David and Goliath, see, e.g., Norman Young, 2004, David and Goliath, Usborne Bible Tales, ISBN: 0746054300.

Nick Butterworth and Mick Inkpen, 2003, Wonderful Earth, John Hunt Ltd., ISBN: 1856080056.

Jenny Wagner, 1980, John Brown, Rose and the Midnight Cat, Puffin Books, ISBN: 0140503064.

Children’s Bible.

Hymn book.

Suggested resources for Unit 9

Nick Butterworth and Mick Inkpen, 1996, Stories Jesus Told: Omnibus Edition, Zondervan Publishing.

Animated Bible Video, Channel 4 Learning.

RE:Quest website: http://www.request.org.uk/.

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