B02 Attainment Target and Areas of Enquiry

B02 Attainment Targets And Areas Of Enquiry

Attainment target

In line with the programmes of study in subjects of the national curriculum, and with the National Curriculum Framework for RE published by the Religious Education Council of England and Wales (REC) in 2013, this syllabus adopts a single attainment target:

By the end of each key stage, students are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

The Six Areas of Enquiry

The six areas of enquiry are unchanged from the previous (2011) syllabus. They form the structure around which pupils’ learning in RE develops. It is important for RE subject leaders to note that each unit in the programme of study combines TWO focuses for learning: one from the first group of three areas of enquiry (A, B or C) plus one from the second group of three (D, E or F). These twin focuses are noted alongside the unit enquiry questions in capital letters.

Pupils revisit each area of enquiry during their studies, and this provides the opportunity for them to deepen their knowledge and understanding of religious and non-religious worldviews over each key stage.

The first three areas (A, B, C) are primarily concerned with what may be learnt ABOUT religious and non-religious worldviews. Here, the emphasis is on the study of key beliefs, teachings, sources, practices and forms of expression.

The second three areas (D, E, F) are much more focused on what may be learnt FROM religious and non-religious worldviews. Here, the emphasis is on the study of identities (awareness), big questions of life (mystery) and people’s deeply held commitments (value).

Good RE effectively balances learning about and learning from Religion and Beliefs.

The six areas of enquiry are outlined in the following pages.

A: BELIEFS, TEACHINGS AND SOURCES

  • Interpreting beliefs, teachings and sources of wisdom and authority in order to understand religions and beliefs.
  • Understanding and responding critically to beliefs and attitudes.

Religious and non-religious ideas of the ultimate.

Aspects for investigation could focus on God, gods, gurus, teachers, scriptures, key texts, enlightenment, truth, prophecy, soul and life after death.

Key question for RE: how do religious and non-religious worldviews understand and develop beliefs and teachings within their traditions?

Related disciplines: metaphysics and textual analysis.

B: PRACTICES AND WAYS OF LIFE

  • Exploring the impact of religions and beliefs on how people live their lives.
  • Understanding and responding critically to beliefs and attitudes.

Religious and non-religious practices and ways of life.

Aspects for investigation could focus on worship, prayer, meditation, celebration and pilgrimage, as well as the religious and non-religious artefacts, special times and festivals associated with them.

Key question for RE: how do people keep in touch with their faith/philosophy?

Related discipline: phenomenology.

C: FORMS OF EXPRESSING MEANING

  • Appreciating that individuals and cultures express their beliefs and values through many different forms.

The many different ways in which prophets, artists, poets, writers, architects, theologians, composers, performers and story-tellers have attempted to express their beliefs and values.

Aspects for investigation could focus on religious music, songs, pictures, symbols, metaphors, poetry, parables, stories, myths, jokes, sculpture, carving, dance, drama, buildings, creeds, prayers, ritual writing, rituals, calligraphy, attitudes, behaviour and lifestyles.

Key question for RE: how do people communicate their beliefs and values to others?

Related discipline: language.

 
D: IDENTITY, DIVERSITY AND BELONGING

  • Understanding how individuals develop a sense of identity and belonging through faith or belief.
  • Exploring the variety, difference and relationships that exist within and between religions, values and beliefs.

Religious and non-religious ideas about human individuality and society.

Aspects for investigation could focus on: relationships, experiences, local / national / global / virtual communities, individuality, personality, feelings, preferences, faith, causes of conflict, dialogue between faiths and philosophies.

Key question for RE: what do people say about human nature?

Related disciplines: anthropology, psychology, sociology.

E: MEANING, PURPOSE AND TRUTH

  • Exploring some of the ultimate questions that confront humanity, and responding imaginatively to them.

The ups, downs and meaning(s) of life’s journey.

Aspects for investigation could focus on: religious and non-religious views about life’s wonders and sadnesses, its triumphs and tribulations, the place and role of human beings within the natural world and on the search for meaning, purpose and truth in philosophy, religion and science.

Key question for RE: how do people tackle the big questions of life?

Related discipline: ontology.

F: VALUES AND COMMITMENTS

  • Understanding how moral values and a sense of obligation can come from beliefs and experience.
  • Evaluating their own and others’ values in order to make informed, rational and imaginative choices.

Moral issues in today’s world.

Aspects for investigation could focus on: religious and non-religious influences on values, commitments, laws, attitudes, behaviour, and moral guidelines, and study of the sources of moral authority which might guide decision making.

Key question for RE: what is the best possible use of life?

Related discipline: ethics.

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